We appreciate that during this difficult time you will have to make important decisions about the funeral you would like. The following information will help you to make an informed choice on the option that is best for you and your family.

If you would like any advice or information about burials, cremations and cemeteries, please contact us:

Bereavement Services
Camelon Cemetery
Dorrator Road
Camelon
FK2 7YJ

01324 503650

Our policies on the cremation of babies and infants and cemetery management are available to read below.

Baby and infant cremation policy
Cemetery management policy

Frequently asked questions

  1. Are there any religious groups which forbid cremation to their members?
  2. Who keeps the cremated remains pending a final decision?
  3. Can items of jewellery be left on the body for cremation?
  4. Can relatives witness the committal of the coffin to the cremator?
  5. Do I need a Funeral Director or can I arrange a funeral myself?
  6. How many of the deaths which occur in Great Britain each year result in cremation?
  7. How soon after the service will the cremation take place?
  8. Is cremation more expensive than burial?
  9. How much does it cost to bury a cremation casket?
  10. Is the coffin cremated with the body?
  11. Is the cremation of a body governed by a code of ethics and working practices?
  12. What are the normal options for disposal of cremated remains?
  13. What happens to the coffin after the committal?
  14. What happens to the cremated remains after the cremation?
  15. What is a Garden of Remembrance and what facilities may be provided there?
  16. What memorial facilities are available at crematoria?
  17. What procedures are followed to ensure that cremated remains are kept separate?
  18. Can more than one body be cremated in a cremator at one time?
  19. Must a burial be associated with a religious ceremony?
  20. What can I plant on a grave?
  21. How do I register a death?
  22. Do I need to use a funeral director?

Are there any religious groups which forbid cremation to their members?

All Christian denominations, including the Roman Catholic Church, allow cremation. Cremation is also acceptable to Sikhs, Hindus, Parsees and Buddhists, but is forbidden by Orthodox Jews and Muslims.


Who keeps the cremated remains pending a final decision?

The family can keep the cremated remain pending a final decision. Alternatively the cremated remains can be kept at the crematorium for a short time. You may have to pay a charge.


Can items of jewellery be left on the body for cremation?

We prefer that all jewellery is removed from the body before the coffin is transported to the crematorium. It will not be possible to recover any items of jewellery after the coffin has arrived at the crematorium.


Can relatives witness the committal of the coffin to the cremator?

Yes. You should arrange this with the Funeral Director as early as possible when making the funeral arrangements.


Do I need a Funeral Director or can I arrange a funeral myself?

You do not need to use a Funeral Director.


How many of the deaths which occur in Great Britain each year result in cremation?

Approximately 70% of all recorded deaths are now followed by cremation.


How soon after the service will the cremation take place?

The cremation always takes place on the same day as the service.


Is cremation more expensive than burial?

The cost of burial is usually much higher than the cost of cremation.


How much does it cost to bury a cremation casket?

Please visit our fees and charges page to find out more.


Is the coffin cremated with the body?

Yes, the coffin is cremated along with the body.


Is the cremation of a body governed by a code of ethics and working practices?

Yes we follow the Federation of Burial and Cremation Authorities' Code of Cremation Practice.


What are the normal options for disposal of cremated remains?

Each cremation has a Garden of Remembrance where cremated remains can be buried. Cremated remains can be removed from the crematorium to be buried in a grave in a cemetery or churchyard or buried in the Garden of Remembrance at another crematorium. They can also be buried or dispersed in an area selected by the family.


What happens to the coffin after the committal?

The coffin is taken to the cremator, in a room known as the committal room. The nameplate on the coffin is checked to make sure the identity is correct. An identity card will then accompany the coffin and the remains until they are removed from the crematorium.


What happens to the cremated remains after the cremation?

After a cremation, the cremated remains are placed in a container with an identity tag for dispersal or collection. Any ferrous metals (iron) from the coffin or metal used in medical implants will be removed and disposed of separately. Under the Code of Cremation Practice, non-ferrous metals will be disposed of. Please do not expect any jewellery left on the body to be returned to you.


What is a Garden of Remembrance and what facilities may be provided there?

The Garden of Remembrance is a special area, often next to the crematorium, which is set aside for the disposal of cremated remains. As the gardens are constantly in use, it may not be possible or appropriate to mark or identify the exact location of individual cremated remains.


What memorial facilities are available at crematoria?

The most common form of memorial is the book of remembrance. The book is usually displayed in a special memorial chapel and can be viewed automatically on the anniversary of the date of death or on request. For more information on the memorial options available, please contact your funeral director or call us on 01324 503650.


What procedures are followed to ensure that cremated remains are kept separate?

A cremator can only accept one coffin at a time and all remains must be removed before the unit can be used again. Each coffin is given an identity card which accompanies the coffin and cremated remains throughout the cremation.


Can more than one body be cremated in a cremator at one time?

Each cremation is carried out separately. Certain exceptions can be made, such as a mother and baby, or twin children. The next of kin must make a specific request for this.


Must a burial be associated with a religious ceremony?

No. The family can arrange any service they wish or no ceremony needs to take place at all. Memorial services can be carried out separately from the burial ceremony.


What can I plant on a grave?

We do not allow planting on any of our sites or graves.


How do I register a death?

Please visit the registering a death page to find out more.


Do I need to use a funeral director?

Although anyone can organise a funeral, most people are happy to hand the funeral arrangements over to a professional as there are many tasks that must be carried out after a death. Many of the tasks carried out by a Funeral Director are very complicated, and may be difficult for a family member to carry out.

If you are thinking of doing it all yourself, you should have an understanding of the legal requirements for a funeral. These include registering the death, getting medical certificates, organising a suitable coffin and organising transportation.

For advice or more information, please contact us.