The Integrated Community Mental Health Teams provide support for people with a mental illness who are living in the community. The team is a partnership between us and NHS Forth Valley.

The team assess, treat, manage care needs and provide support to people with severe and enduring mental health problems. The support can be to help you to stay independent, day opportunities or short breaks.

The teams also provide support and advice to NHS, Housing and Social Work services and the police about people with less serious mental health problems who need help from these services.


How you can get a service from the Integrated Community Mental Health Team?

If you need help, please contact your local Social Work office. They may refer you to the Integrated Community Mental Health Team if your needs and circumstances are complex.

You can also be referred to the team by:

  • A GP
  • Consultant psychiatrists
  • Community care teams
  • Specialist mental health services such as specialist mental health services such as hospitals or day hospitals

When the team receives a referral they will decide if they are the right people to help. If they are, they will assess your needs.

The team will give priority to helping people with severe or continuing mental health problems.

This includes people who:

  • Are diagnosed as having a mental illness, such as schizophrenia or severe affective disorder
  • Experience a substantial disability as a result of their mental health problems, such as an inability to care for themselves independently, stay in relationships or work
  • Are acutely mentally unwell or have a long-term mental illness
  • Have had recurring crises for which they have frequently needed help from mental health and other services
  • Occasionally present a significant risk to their own safety or that of others

What services do Mental Health Officers provide under the law?

Under the Mental Health Act you may be assessed and treated under:

  • An emergency detention order
  • A short-term detention certificate
  • A compulsory treatment order

Under the Criminal Procedures Act you might receive:

  • An assessment order
  • A treatment order
  • An interim compulsion order
  • A compulsion order
  • A hospital direction
  • A transfer for treatment direction

What the MHO will do

In both these circumstances the MHO will:

  • interview you
  • explain your rights, including your rights to independent advocacy, legal representation and to a named person to look after your rights
  • prepare a Social Circumstances Report (SCR) if you have been detained under any of the orders listed above

Under the Adults with Incapacity Act someone may apply for a legal order that affects you; that is:

  • a welfare guardianship order
  • an intervention order

The MHO will also:

  • assess your mental health
  • write a report on whether the welfare guardianship order application is suitable
  • supervise and review private welfare guardians

What is a Power of Attorney (POA)?

A power of attorney is when you appoint someone to make decisions for you. If you are unable to manage your affairs, for example, due to dementia – your POA can manage them.

You can ask a family member, a close friend or a solicitor to become your POA. You need to be capable of making decisions about who you nominate and what powers you want the person to have.

You can appoint a POA to take decisions about:

  • your property, financial affairs or both of these and
  • your personal welfare needs

Where can I get help with a Power of Attorney?

You can contact the Office of the Public Guardian for help and advice. You can contact them on:

Office of the Public Guardian
Hadrian House
Callendar Business Park
Falkirk
FK1 1XR
01324 678300

You can also contact your solicitor.


What is a guardianship order?

If an adult is no longer able to manage or make decisions about their own welfare, financial or legal affairs, a guardianship order can be granted.

A guardianship order means that relatives, carers or the council can apply to manage these things on the adult's behalf.

There are two types of guardianship order, a welfare guardianship order and a financial guardianship order. Depending on what things the person has difficulty in making decisions about, one or both of these guardianship orders may be needed.

Where can I get help with guardianship orders?

You can contact your solicitor or your social worker if Social Work services are involved.

You can also contact the Office of the Public Guardian If someone is appointed to look after your affairs, the Office of the Public Guardian’s role includes supervising that person to make sure they are looking after your affairs properly. You can contact them on:

Office of the Public Guardian
Hadrian House
Callendar Business Park
Falkirk
FK1 1XR
01324 678300


What is an intervention order?

If an adult is no longer able to manage or make decisions about their own welfare, financial or legal affairs, an intervention order can be granted.

A intervention order means that relatives, carers or the council can apply to manage these things on the adult’s behalf.

An intervention order is used if someone had to make a single decision or action on someone’s behalf, such as giving up a tenancy or selling a house.

This is different to a guardianship order where there are more issues to be managed and decisions to be made continuously. Guardianship orders: what these are and how to get help

Intervention orders are legal procedures that come under the Adults with Incapacity Act Where can I get help with an intervention order? You can contact your solicitor or your social worker if Social Work services are involved.

You can also contact the Office of the Public Guardian. If someone is appointed to look after your affairs, the Office of the Public Guardian’s role includes supervising that person to make sure they are looking after your affairs properly. You can contact them on

Office of the Public Guardian
Hadrian House
Callendar Business Park
Falkirk
FK1 1XR
01324 678300